Everyday Psychopaths for Free?

Yes, the headline is right. Right now, I’m giving away my short story collection Everyday Psychopaths for free at Smashwords and Kobo.

The idea with giving away a book for free is obviously that you check out my other books, The Wake-Up Call and Hollywood Ass.

Right now, I’m slowly hacking away at my novelette Six Strings, but I’m not exactly moving at light speed, to be honest with you. But, writing a book is nothing that needs to be rushed, it’s my little self-indulgent hobby that I tinker with from time to time. You could say that I’m slowly learning to keep my giant expectations at bay.

However, I’m happy that the New York start-up Pubslush wrote a few words about me and my books in their blog.

I’m also honored to have had business guru Tom Peters buy The Wake-Up Call and tweet to me about it. He’s a person I respect very much. I shared the event on my facebook page like this: “Honored to have business author legend Tom Peters buy The Wake-Up Call today and then tweet to me about it. The only problem is that the importance of my own books are puny compared to his.”

That’s enough about what’s going on in my writing life. On a writing-related side note, I’m happy that Lenah is getting more and more writing gigs. It’s a big plus that we share the same passions in life and can urge each other on, not to mention proofread each other’s work!

Being an independent author or freelance writer can be pretty lonely, so it’s great to be able to tackle things more like a team.

Thanks for reading and don’t forget to download a free book or tell your friends about it. My next post won’t be so much bragging/marketing-focused, I promise!

Write What You Know?

what_you_know

One of my favorite books on writing (aptly named “On Writing“) is written by Stephen King and in that book he regurgitates and then chews on one of the most common rules for writing; write what you know.

First time I read it it made a helluva lot of sense. I mean, it does sound damn difficult to write about space when you have spent all of your life with your feet planted firmly on the ground. Yet, if you can’t write about what you like, doesn’t it take away the fun of it? The reason you write is because it’s fun, right? Then it doesn’t make sense to write about accounting or plumbing (because honestly that doesn’t sound very exciting for a plot).

So the learning from this is that you should write what you LIKE. Whatever it is. Maybe you want to write about Martian plumbers? Knock yourself out. Or maybe you write a story about an accountant and his battle with Microsoft Excel? And maybe that story will be fantastic. Because it’s all about how you tell it.

Let’s say you want to write about an obese man in his upper twenties who’s decided to do what it takes to reach his dream of becoming an astronaut. Chances are you don’t know jack about being an astronaut, you might not be in your twenties anymore, and you’ve always been quite skinny. Then you need to do research, you need to listen, you need to soak up information to be able to make the story as TRUE as possible.

Don’t be lazy with research. Today you don’t have to bog your head down in library books for hours on end. Today you have your friend Google and his father the Internet. You might not be able to feel the sea breeze in the Caribbean by image browsing, but you can get a LOT of information online. Use it to your advantage. You’re going to learn a lot of stuff you don’t need, but they say we’re only using about 10 percent of our brains so my guess is you have space.

For me it works best to mix write what you know with write what you like. I have to feel an interest in the story, the characters, the topic and I have to feel the confidence that I can tell the story in the right way and make justice to it. Otherwise both I and the reader lose.

When I wrote The Wake-Up Call I placed it in a setting I was very familiar with (the advertising world) and placed it in a city I love (New York), but I also went out of my comfort zone when writing about Mexico. I wrote about something I care about (the pace of the world, how to deal with a breakdown, how to face life when it finally catches up with you) and from the viewpoint of a character I’m interested in (the narrator, Jack Reynolds). I didn’t plot it, because I don’t like plotted novels so much, and because there’s a joy in being able to unearth the fossil (another one of King’s phrases) and discover the story as I wrote it. This leads to more editing and plenty more rewrites than a plotted novel, but is a lot more fun and leads to a more creative and original end result (I hope).

The Wake-Up Call is my first published novel, although I’ve been writing stories since I was a kid. It was quite an effort to pull off, because I couldn’t stop rewriting it, but after the tenth or so rewrite I decided this was it. It was time to hit the publish button.

This was in the beginning of September this year. Since then I sold a decent number of books and gotten a good review or three, but I’ve realized that to sell even more I should probably have chosen a stronger niche or genre. It seems like you really need to do your marketing research properly, even as an indie author/enthusiast.

What do I mean by that? Well, you could argue that there’s no point in writing books that nobody wants to read. Or maybe there is? Maybe you just have to get that story out of you, because YOU believe in it and YOU feel the need to tell it?

To be honest with you, I don’t know. Everybody wants to sell or at least for people to read what they’ve written and there’s few things as sad as unappreciated writers who spent years on a book that very few ever read. An extreme example would be John Kennedy Toole and his Pulitzer prize winning book A Confederacy of Dunces. Toole got the prize posthumously because he committed suicide after the book he’d worked on and believed in so strongly failed to get published.

But today in the era of self-publishing and DYI-marketing getting published is not the problem, it’s getting people to like what you write and to SELL (we don’t like that word do we? – me I think there’s a reason it rhymes with HELL).

The general feeling I have about most self-published authors is that they write either science-fiction, thrillers, crime, or romance and that these genres are very popular. Because even if you write for a small niche, the competition will be less tough and the readership more devoted to the topic and by default more interested in what you have to say.

This is what I’ve slowly come to realize. It might be that I’m off, but it’s a strong feeling.

I decided to write a book I would like to read myself (which I think goes for most writers, otherwise it would be weird) and since I’m not so much into science-fiction, romance, thrillers, and crime – I guess I’ll have to call it contemporary, commercial or general fiction (the categories among e-book sellers like Amazon, Smashwords and Kobo vary greatly).

And now here comes the crunch. Who does this appeal to? Everyone who’s into fiction? No. The problem is that the definition is so broad and the competition so fierce that it’s very hard to reach your ideal reader. Who would like The Wake-Up Call? I hope a lot of people. But how do I reach out to them and compete with established publishers and authors?

People would say social media (twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, Google Plus, etc), but the problem there is to reach the right person and to win their attention with your story.

I’ve come to learn it’s not easy. But you can’t give up either. You wrote the damn thing and you want people to read it.

Just take John Locke for example. He claims he spent $25 000 on marketing and didn’t get very much out of it. Then he started blogging and twittering and not long thereafter he was in the Kindle Million Club.

So social media might work for you after all.

I’m trying a little bit of everything myself. We’ll see how it goes and I promise to keep you posted on this very blog (and on twitter or Goodreads of course!)

If you want to help me out why not check out my book THE WAKE-UP CALL on Amazon, Nook, iTunes, Smashwords

I know this was long and if you managed to get this far I just want to say…Thanks for listening.

The Wake-Up Call Philosophy


Oh, crap, I’m in a preaching mode…

The Wake-Up Call philosophy is about re-evaluation, about looking at yourself and asking yourself where you are in your life and where you would want to be.

It’s good to have a regular wake-up call. It’s nice to smell the coffee. It’s educating to read the writing on the wall. To pinch yourself once in a while. Hard.

I think life should be under constant evaluation, with out over-analyzing everything. Re-evaluate yourself using your gut and your heart and not your mind. This is the best way to get the good answers on where and who you are  in your life right now.

Stopping and thinking things over and being able to question decisions and actions without judging yourself too hard is incredibly important to achieving some kind of happiness.

And then we get into the never-ending question about what happiness really is and then you think you’re stuck right? Wrong. There’s no general term of what being happy is. Only you can know what happiness means to you and the only way to figure it out is to stop and ask yourself those questions:

Am I where I want to be?
Do I live the life I want to have?
Am I doing the things I dreamt of doing?

And if you’re saying NO to any one of the questions above you need to ask yourself why and you need to ask yourself how you can say YES.

Then you do what it takes. NO excuses. Just do it. Do it.

Come on.

Do it.

Ps. If you think any of this make any sense, why not check out my novel The Wake-Up Call at Amazon or Smashwords? Ds.